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UX Design – Improve yourself

Practice makes perfect.

Or at least, it does help improve your skills.

It does make you a better designer.

A better problem solver.

A better engineer.

A better maker.

Just better.

Here are some resources to up your game.

1. Designercize

Fancy designing a sortable list view for a habit-tracking app to help film snobs?

Or how about designin dashboard for a smart home watering system, to help social media managers?

or, a a settings view for a professional networking site designed for restaurant patrons?

Really, there are no limits to imagination and this very entertaining game interfaced design for a design learning website for designers – is real neat.

Go check the site

2. 100 days of product design

This is a challenge to take to improve your design skills – everyday with one new thing.

For instance on day 01: Design thinking – where you need to use design thinking to create something new : a new way to get to school, a time travel machine a personal jetpack that fits in a backpack. or on day 05: empathy maps, where you make an empathy map for a coffee shop.

Go check the site

Daily UX Challenge

If you like to take things day by day, here is the daily UX challenge – where get a daily email for 20 days  – to improve your UX skills.

 

Go check the site.

 

100 Examples of UX problems

Jon Crabb is a UX designer from London and he’s put together a great list of of UX problems to think about – which I think does largely broaden the scope of UX thinking.

Problems range from :

Find your way around a new city.
Fill small amounts of “bored” time in your day with something interesting.
Split a check at a restaurant.
Split a check at a restaurant between vegetarians and meat-eaters.
Split a check at a restaurant between drinkers and nondrinkers.

to recommend a funnel management flow to Google or design a new app for Go Pro.

Go check the site.

 

JS tooling

The web is evolving.

Here are some element to catch up on VueJs and NodeJS

 

Building a RESTful API with Node.js

NodeJS Shopping Cart

Vue.js 2 – Getting Started

Build a Chat Room from scratch (vuejs, nodejs, socket.io)

Full Stack Web App using Vue.js & Express.js

Hotel system in Vue.js

Vue.js 2 & Vuex (Basics)

Rethinking education – 3 unconventional approaches

 

Education is hard.

Creating a learning process where you transfer experience to one person to an other is not a trivial task.

Else learning would look like this:

 

But it is not.

So… until then, we have to find other ways to go about it.

Here are some interesting approaches I have stumbled upon, which are really worth having a look at:

Mike Fairclough – the badass

The guy is headmaster of the West Rise School.

He is a kind of a mix between Davy Crockett and Albus Dumbledore.

He runs a primary school in Eastbourne in the UK.

Over there, kids are learning to skin a rabbit or make a campfire or shot guns.

Better I let you watch :

So obviously, not everybody will want their kids to learn these kind of skills.

(However, I am pretty sure all kids would dream to have these kind of activities at school)

In any case, it is a good demonstration that schools can accommodate other ways to teach.

And a big part of responsibility for the change depends on the good will and the skills of teachers and the leadership of the administration.

 

Studio school – let’s get real

For everyone who ever complained schools don’t remotely provide an environnement to prepare students for work – as in “work the real world” – here is an approach that is exactly trying to do that.

The studio school brings school closer to the reality of a company by organising the entire school around projects and cross-disciplinary teams etc.

The effort was initiated by Geoff Mulgan, a couple of years ago, and it is slowly catching up – you can find Studio schools nearly all across the UK and if you have 6 min, I’d rather have you watch the video than me writing about it.

 

Mike Row – Dirty Jobs

The third guy is living in the US, and the story is a bit different because it is not about what you do in the school but what you do after school – and how much is school responsible for that – or not.

First, it is important to state that Mike Row is kind of a celebrity in the US, or at least, pretty well known, he has run 8 series of a show on the Discovery channel called “Dirty Jobs” where he does all kind of blue collar jobs. Now, if like me, you don’t live in the US – he is probably not someone you’ve heard about before.

However, whether you know him or not, doesn’t matter much – because the following 40 min is quite an interesting dig into his philosophy on learning, life and education, and not really the kind of thing that is featured on Discovery channel where they have him deal with a lot bullshit (quite literally).

 

What to take from this

First, I think we can take one thing : it is ok to do things differently – you can still do some pretty amazing things.

Second, eating shit and taking risk is a great way to learn. Especially within a safe framework like school where you can ensure no one get hurt for real along the way.

Third, if you are not mainstream, people will love you or hate you but it will take time before they will follow you, it’s just easier for them to simply judge you.

Last point, the crowd doesn’t matter, you do it for the people who benefit from your work and that is what really matter